The church has a
major PR problem.

The church has a
major PR problem.

The church has a
major PR problem.

Upcoming Release from author Aimee Byrd

The Hope in Our Scars

Finding the Bride of Christ in the Underground of Disillusionment

Some things happening in the church these days should provoke our anger. It’s racked with scandals of fraud, abuse, cover-up. It’s embroiled in racism, misogyny, marginalization, and hatred. The truth is that we have to fight to love Christ’s church. Many of us are left wondering what kind of hope can the church offer if its leaders will not care for its wounds, admit their complicity, and move toward true reconciliation.

Having tread her own path of disillusionment, Aimee Byrd invites us to see Christ amidst the chaos.

Releasing May 7, 2024

Zondervan Reflective

Upcoming Release from author Aimee Byrd

The Hope in Our Scars

Finding the Bride of Christ in the Underground of Disillusionment

Some things happening in the church these days should provoke our anger. It’s racked with scandals of fraud, abuse, cover-up. It’s embroiled in racism, misogyny, marginalization, and hatred. The truth is that we have to fight to love Christ’s church. Many of us are left wondering what kind of hope can the church offer if its leaders will not care for its wounds, admit their complicity, and move toward true reconciliation.

Having tread her own path of disillusionment, Aimee Byrd invites us to see Christ amidst the chaos.

Releasing May 7, 2024

Zondervan Reflective

Upcoming Release from author Aimee Byrd

The Hope in Our Scars

Finding the Bride of Christ in the Underground of Disillusionment

Some things happening in the church these days should provoke our anger. It’s racked with scandals of fraud, abuse, cover-up. It’s embroiled in racism, misogyny, marginalization, and hatred. The truth is that we have to fight to love Christ’s church. Many of us are left wondering what kind of hope can the church offer if its leaders will not care for its wounds, admit their complicity, and move toward true reconciliation.

Having tread her own path of disillusionment, Aimee Byrd invites us to see Christ amidst the chaos.

Releasing May 7, 2024

Zondervan Reflective

Pre-order Bonuses!

Pre-order your copy of the book in any format and fill out this form to receive the following bonuses…

  • The first chapter to read instantly
  • 2 FREE video sessions from the Hope in our Scars Video Study
  • 30% code for the video study
  • Outtakes from interviews with Nijay Gupta, Amy Peeler, Kristin Kobes Du Mez, and Chuck De Groat

You will receive the first chapter instantly and we’ll email you with access to the rest of bonus items on release day, May 7!

By submitting your email address, you understand that you will receive email communications from Aimee Byrd providing information about products and services from Aimee Byrd and her affiliates. You may unsubscribe from these email communications at any time.

Aimee Byrd peels back the church’s underlying and pervasive theology of power to face the shame that lurks there and find the lasting hope of belonging in Christ.

From the author of Recovering from Biblical Manhood and Womanhood comes a passionate plea to work through our disillusionment with the church and rediscover what’s true and beautiful about our covenantal union with Christ.

Having tread her own path of disillusionment, Aimee Byrd invites us to see Christ among the chaos so apparent in his church. Along the way, Aimee guides us through deeply theological and personal reflections on how we can:

  • Cultivate healthier forms of trust by recognizing power structures at work.
  • Understand the limits of authority, and free ourselves from tribes and celebrity culture.
  • Take appropriate social risks by speaking up when we’re uncomfortable.
  • Rediscover how our stories matter to God.

This book is written to those who have been wounded by the church. To those who have suffered abuse at the hands of church leaders and are left with deep scars. To those who are disillusioned or deconstructing their faith, The Hope in Our Scars offers a way forward with a God who walks with us in our affliction and wants to make it into something beautiful.

Preorder The Hope in Our Scars today

Preorder The Hope in Our Scars today

Aimee Byrd is author, speaker, blogger, podcaster, and former coffee shop owner. Aimee is author of several books, including Why Can’t We Be Friends?, Recovering from Biblical Manhood and Womanhood, and Sexual Reformation. Her articles have appeared in First Things, Table Talk, Modern Reformation, By Faith, New Horizons,Ordained Servant, Harvest USA, and Credo Magazine and she has been interviewed and quoted in Christianity Today and The Atlantic.

Visit AimeeByrd.com to learn more about Aimee and her other books. 

"This is a book that will grow your soul. In the midst of albeit important debates about the meaning of masculinity, femininity, authority, and submission, Aimee invites us to rise above and listen—listen to Jesus singing over us, pointing us to redemption centered on himself. Instead of viewing each other as rivals for power, let’s join in the song—the Song of Songs—and embrace each other as gifts. May that song of reformation lead to our dance of celebration!"

SHEILA WRAY GREGOIRE, author, on Aimee’s book Sexual Reformation

'The biblical-manhood-and-womanhood movement has generated more heat than light because it has failed to recognize that its own pet theories of manhood and womanhood derive more from black-and-white TV of the 1950s–think of Timmy's mom and dad in Lassie–than from the Bible. What makes this obvious are the many studies on what it was like to be a man or a woman in the time of Barak and Deborah, Ruth and David, or the Syrophoenician woman and Jesus, or Priscilla and Paul in their Greco-Roman world. We now know that the so-called manhood-and-womanhood movement is a set of cultural ideas imposed on the Bible itself. Byrd offers here enduring wisdom and wit about how we as Christians ought to relate to one another as 'coed colaborers.''

SCOT MCKNIGHT, professor of New Testament, Northern Seminary, on Aimee’s book Recovering from Biblical Manhood and Womanhood

'Aimee Byrd, in The Sexual Reformation, beautifully shows us the need for nothing less than a reformation in how the church understands and discusses sexuality that more fully resonates with the biblical vision. Byrd powerfully calls us to discover a deeper song whereby our embodiment as male and female resonates with the great marriage of heaven and earth made possible through the incarnation and the marriage supper of the lamb.'

TIMOTHY C. TENNENT, president, Asbury Theological Seminar

"This is a book that will grow your soul. In the midst of albeit important debates about the meaning of masculinity, femininity, authority, and submission, Aimee invites us to rise above and listen—listen to Jesus singing over us, pointing us to redemption centered on himself. Instead of viewing each other as rivals for power, let’s join in the song—the Song of Songs—and embrace each other as gifts. May that song of reformation lead to our dance of celebration!"

SHEILA WRAY GREGOIRE, author, on Aimee’s book Sexual Reformation

'The biblical-manhood-and-womanhood movement has generated more heat than light because it has failed to recognize that its own pet theories of manhood and womanhood derive more from black-and-white TV of the 1950s–think of Timmy's mom and dad in Lassie–than from the Bible. What makes this obvious are the many studies on what it was like to be a man or a woman in the time of Barak and Deborah, Ruth and David, or the Syrophoenician woman and Jesus, or Priscilla and Paul in their Greco-Roman world. We now know that the so-called manhood-and-womanhood movement is a set of cultural ideas imposed on the Bible itself. Byrd offers here enduring wisdom and wit about how we as Christians ought to relate to one another as 'coed colaborers.''

SCOT MCKNIGHT, professor of New Testament, Northern Seminary, on Aimee’s book Recovering from Biblical Manhood and Womanhood

'Aimee Byrd, in The Sexual Reformation, beautifully shows us the need for nothing less than a reformation in how the church understands and discusses sexuality that more fully resonates with the biblical vision. Byrd powerfully calls us to discover a deeper song whereby our embodiment as male and female resonates with the great marriage of heaven and earth made possible through the incarnation and the marriage supper of the lamb.'

TIMOTHY C. TENNENT, president, Asbury Theological Seminar